Tim Webmoor on social software and heritage politics

Great talk last night from Tim Webmoor at our New Media workshop at Stanford. He is working at the fabulous site of Teotihuacan, Mexico, on different attitudes and understandings of the site – local and beyond. Teotihuacan has become emblematic of the Mexican state and Mexican heritage. I posted some comments last year from Meg…

creationism, intelligent design and redefinitions of science

Suzanne Goldenberg writes an informative summary today in the Guardian of the latest stage of the creationist debate in the US – Religious right fights science for the heart of America. Classroom confrontations between God and science are under way in 17 states, according to the National Centre for Science Education. In Missouri, state legislators…

forgery and illicit antiquities – the importance of narrative

From the Guardian today – Forgers ‘tried to rewrite biblical history’ Hundreds of biblical artefacts in museums all over the world could be fakes, it has emerged after Israeli investigators uncovered what they claim is a sophisticated forgery ring. Four men have been charged with the faking of some of the most important biblical discoveries…

Michael Herzfeld on comparative ethnography

Comparing one society with another Michael Herzfeld was talking today about ethnography, about the centrality of comparison. His latest work is to compare Greece with Italy with Thailand. Michael Herzfeld at Stanford today Many anthropologists have become anxious about the comparative method, because comparing one society with another with the aim of understanding each through…

Cleveland Art Museum – another case of dodgy dealing in the art market?

Another major museum may well be supporting the illicit trade in dodgy (stolen, looted, even fake) works of art. (See my comment in February on the Metropolitan in New York and some major collections of Graeco-Roman art – [Link]) CLEVELAND (AP) – Some archeologists say the Cleveland Museum of Art may encourage smuggling and the…